Nothing better demonstrates the unfairness of our electoral system


Nothing better demonstrates the unfairness of our electoral system than the next

PR - Public Responsibility?

three charts, all based on the results of the 6 May election:

Nothing better demonstrates the unfairness of our electoral system than the next three charts, all based on the results of the 6 May election:

Hung out to try - working together for the Nation not the Party

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2 Comments

Filed under A solution to Party Political Funding, British Politics, Independent Parliamentary Candidate, Pre-Hung-Parliament Horse-trading, The next Govt could be operating unconstitutionally, What if the Parliament is hung?

2 responses to “Nothing better demonstrates the unfairness of our electoral system

  1. The Tories polled 23.4% of the total votes available (36% of 65%) and got 306 seats

    Labour polled 18% of the total votes available (29% of 65%) and got 258

    LibDems polled 15% (23% of 65%) and got 57 seats.

    The remaining parties collectively polled 6.6% of the remaining votes cast (12% of 65%) and got 28 seats between them

    (NB I seat still to be decided later, but it’s a safe Tory seat).

    If you divided up the seats on a straight mathematical basis, the Tories should have 234 seats, Labour 189 and the LibDems 150 with 76 seats across all other parties.

    That gives you a better idea of the fairness of the situation – Cameron’s got no mandate to be the next leader of this country anymore than Clegg or Brown.

    Let’s recognise that we have better ways to govern than using an 800 year old system. If the current system is horses, the the “Holy Grail” of PR is steam – let’s move straight to electricity and use the Internet empowering people to Vote For Yourself directly!

    • David

      Thanks for your comment. In DISQUS [Power2010] I have advocated thus:

      Take Back Parliament | Sign the Petition

      The electoral and political governance must change quickly to better serve the electorate of UK and to remove dissatisfaction, disaffection, disenfranchisement and disengagement.

      We can then begin to increase electoral engagement and hope for representative Parliament and the Upper House.

      The Reforms I have in mind are:

      [1] All candidates must stand only the Constituency where they are generally domiciled and have contributed to community governance for at least 5 years.
      [2] Directly elected PM
      [3] Separating the Executive from the Legislative with the Cabinet chosen by the PM but not sitting in Parliament.
      [4] Hold referendum on PR or AV or any other fairer electoral system
      [5] Representative elected Upper House & Parliament
      [6] Set up English Parliament for English matters
      [7] Reduce total MPs to a third.
      [8] Effective de-selection process for dishonest MPs + forfeiture of ‘pensions’ ‘resettlement payments’
      [9] Holding a referendum on the status of UK within the EU
      [10] Holding a referendum on British troops overseas – reducing to NATO average
      [11] Holding a primary referendum on referendum to be held each time when 5% of the electorate request it. Thus retaining the ‘power with the people’.
      [12] limiting the working of the Parliament during the day,
      [13] Introducing e-lectoral engagement via Internet reducing massive election costs and the incompetent debacles of the ‘Victorian System’ and the inability of the electors to vote after 22:00.
      [14] England needs a written Constitution specifying that there cannot be a ‘sitting PM’ in No.10 especially when ‘unelected’ and when the majority of the electorate have chosen another government albeit not quite decisively enough.
      [15] The same constitution ought to also accord the same empathy and respect as any other ‘Party Candidate’ to any Independent Candidate should s/he pass away just prior to the General election

      I promoted e-lectoral engagement in 2005 and have mentioned herein at point number 13.

      Regards

      Anant

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