On This Day 1984: Troops raid Golden Temple in Amritsar


 

The storming of the temple, or Operation Bluestar, followed weeks of growing tension between the government of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi and Sikhs in the northern state of Punjab, who believe they are being discriminated against by the Hindu majority.

Government ministers later admitted they had underestimated the strength of Sikh feeling about the attack.

Prime Minister Gandhi said: "The necessity now is to heal the wounds inflicted on the hearts of the people."

But the storming of the Sikhs’ holiest religious shrine started a chain of events and retaliations which led eventually to the prime minister herself being assassinated by two of her Sikh bodyguards, on 31 October.

 

Comment: Not only the then Indian Govt including Indira Gandhi PM had underestimated the strength of the feelings within the Sikh Communities but she had seriously denigrated the very Sikh Shaheed who had given his or her life in procuring the freedom for the White West in WWII (for over 2 million Indian Javans sacrificed their lives in the struggle for retaining the freedom that we all enjoy) and further sacrifices have been made in Indo-Chinese war and Indo-Pakistani Wars during which her own father )as the then continuing first PM) was criticised for not equipping the army with more modern arms enabling them to fight the Chinese. the non-alignment and non-innovative ‘Chalta-hai’ policy had cost India bitterly in the demoralised Javans & international prestige. Socialism has its limits of survival politically & militarily.

Daily Inspiration

Those who hate you don’t win unless you hate them back; and then you destroy yourself.

 

4 Comments

Filed under PERSISTING DISCRIMINATION AFFECTS SOCIAL TRUST

4 responses to “On This Day 1984: Troops raid Golden Temple in Amritsar

  1. sillygloop

    If militants are holed up in a religious place, there’s a fine balancing act to be followed. Tough situations test the command chain and that’s where their mettle really shows.

  2. Anant M

    You are quite right when you label those fighting for their cause as ‘militants’. It quite rightly requires an incisive action. But look at the mitigating circumstances:
     
    http://www.akj.org.uk/literature/article.asp?b=t&s=gurmat&f=kurbani05
     
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/1372258.stm
     
    I believe that the Sikh Community has sacrificed more than any other Indian community in WWI, WWII and several internal wars with Pakistan & China. Their contribution must be recognised publicly and unequivocally. Should that happen, they may not want a separate state like Kashmiris do.

  3. sillygloop

    They definitely have given a lot of sacrifices and have added to the rich cultural heritage of this country. We have a sikh prime minister and that is an indication of how much an integral part of Indian society sikhs have become. I think the Indian state has long become callous to recognizing the contributions of different sections of society as the govt has become more interested in vote bank politics. I dont think it will recognize any community separately as it would cause other communities to come up with similar issues. Each community should reconcile with the fact that no one gets anything from the govt these days 🙂

  4. Anant M

    It is about time that the Indian people recognised that they give rise to their  government of the people, by the people, and for the people.
     
    As regards the Sikh PM, I am personally glad that he is the first Sikh ever to attain that position and that too not by design but by default and that too of a ‘foreigner’ who has been elevated to – the ‘apna’ or our-own level due to marriage to Indira Gandhi’s son or Jawaharlal Nehru’s grandson – hold the highest office in the land.
     
    Although from a female and Italian and equality point of view I commend such an altruistic choice but given the indigenous diversity of India itself – this choice of Sonia may well have been ill-considered & made merely and only due to my assertion of persisting ‘hero worship syndrome amongst Indians’ and therefore ill-considered given the mettle and calibre of other candidates such as Manmohan Singh who, otherwise, would not have had a look-in let alone a chance.
     
    That, in my view, is what must change.

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